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Murder Victims' Families for Human Rights
2161 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA  02140

(617)-491-9600

info@
murdervictimsfamilies.org

 

Rev. Walt Everett

Home Up Bill Babbitt Renny Cushing Rev. Walt Everett Toshi Kazama Jeanne Bishop Robert Meeropol Bill Pelke Vicki Schieber Bud Welch

 

Rev. Walt Everett

In 1987 Walt Everett’s son, Scott, was shot and killed at the age of 24. For almost a year afterwards, Walt’s emotional state moved from rage to depression. He found it difficult to even go through the motions of his work as pastor of a United Methodist Church.

 It was only at the sentencing when he heard Mike Carlucci express remorse for killing Scott that Walt felt God nudging him towards forgiveness. Walt describes this journey as the most difficult thing he has ever had to do.

 He wrote to Mike on the first anniversary of Scott’s death. Thus began a correspondence, which led to visits and finally to Walt’s testifying on Mike’s behalf at a parole hearing. Based on this testimony, Mike obtained an early release and went to work for a trucking firm where his boss described him as “the best supervisor I ever had.”

 Walt and Mike often speak together at universities, churches and community groups about the healing power of forgiveness, healing for both the forgiven and forgiver.

Walt is a pastor of United Methodist Church of Hartford, Connecticut. He met his wife at a bereavement group and between them they have six children, four of whom are still living, and eight grandchildren.

 Walt is an ardent advocate of the anti-death penalty movement and is active in numerous abolition and restorative justice organizations. His story has been told in numerous publications including an extensive profile in Rolling Stone.

 He believes MVFHR is “vital to the cause of abolition. For too long we have allowed nations, including the United States of America, to go it alone when it comes to human rights issues. The intentional taking of a human life is a violation of the growing standards of morality of the worldwide community, and violates, as well, our understanding of who we are in God’s world.”

On June 27, 2005, the Connecticut Network to Abolish the Death Penalty presented Reverend Walter Everett with its newly created Humanitarian Award.

Links:

Walt's interview with NPR on December 16, 2004

Walt's story as it appeared in Rolling Stone Magazine

Printable Bio

Home Up Bill Babbitt Renny Cushing Rev. Walt Everett Toshi Kazama Jeanne Bishop Robert Meeropol Bill Pelke Vicki Schieber Bud Welch